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Please leave a comment if you would like to friend me.
lazy_hoor: (wtf)
I don't update much lately because not a lot has been happening.  We've been saving up for a deposit on a house which has meant we're not going out or doing much at all.  Everything else in my life is fine - Mum's ok, settled, eating, happy in the home.  Work is... much the same - teachers still mental - I'm going to the annual congress in Galway so that should be fun. Everyone in the office is still very strange but now there's another person with an incredibly large ego who doesn't seem to like women much and is doing his best to ensure the executive is full of men like him. Nice.

But anyway, NEWS! We are in the process of buying a house!  It's on a long but quiet road in Perrystown, which isn't too far from work, and a bit closer to town.  Also not an uphill cycle all the way home as is our current house.  New place has a massive south facing garden and doesn't need much doing to it other than a lick of paint and some new built in wardrobes -  the current ones have a weird kind of mother of pearl pattern on them.  So yes, exciting but very daunting at the same time.  House prices have gone up quite a lot since we first started looking so 27 years of massive debt is freaking me out a little.  Yesterday when we got the news I went from YAY! to PANICPANICPANIC but today I'm just looking forward to having a space I can feel totally at home in.
lazy_hoor: (tongue)
Today the broadband decided to go down. I am five days from a deadline and need to access 19th century newspaper archives. As good as this phone is, I don't think I can read scanned images of 3pt font on it.

I guess I'll work on the footnotes and proof reading, and not just weep quietly in the corner.
lazy_hoor: (Drunk Victorian Brummie)
'THE RIGHT OF BUTCHERS TO KICK THEIR CUSTOMERS'

British customer service: ever was it thus.
lazy_hoor: (Drunk Victorian Brummie)
I have just read Bray and Environs  a book written circa 1903 by Arthur L Doran; a man who appears to be the bastard son of Mr Logic and Victorian Dad:

STATELY HOMES AND THEIR OWNERS.
INTRODUCTORY REMARKS.
A great deal of rank nonsense is often promulgated anent the exclusiveness of noble owners, and their meanness in charging for admission to their demesnes. As to the charges, divide the total probable return from any such levy by the cost of maintaining a great estate, and what kind of negligible quotient do you get?

As to their exclusiveness, will you, oh perfervid Radical, or Socialistic brother, try and change places for a little, and, suppose yourself taking a meditative stroll in your own grounds, when, enters the wild, "woolly" and intrusive stranger, slaps you familiarly on the back, calls you "old chap," and perhaps offers you a stale sandwich or a draught of usquebaugh in vitro.  Gone is all introspection, and you become awake to the fact that a courteous concession has been converted into an unorganised raid. Your coping stones have been sent bounding down the valley, your choicest shrubs wantonly broken, and cherished flowers culled by sacrilegious hands.

A varied deposit of newspaper, orange-peel, and broken bottles do not adorn your sacred places; and possibly a dangerous and destructive fire has been started to make a tripper's holiday, who now, it is to be supposed, thoroughly happy and exhilarated, takes himself off to the strains of some profane ditty roared out in execrable time, tune, and taste, to the unmelodious accompaniment of a concertina.

Would you not, oh fellow-man, forthwith swear a mighty oath, "by oak, and ash, and thorn," to abate such nuisance by strictest of inhibitions? Truly the actions of such Bedlamites fill one with despair for the little breed of men in these days as when, in much bitterness of soul, the Latin poet sung -

"Odi profanum vulgus et arceo"

For each man, of whatever rank, cherishes firmly in his soul the conviction of the need of inviolability respecting his home, and a rooted aversion to having strangers "messing" about his bailiwick.

The numerous race of macers, welshers, duffers, and cads can, on occasion, be constrained, mostly by muscular methods, to conform to the sporting fiat of "Own up, pay up. and shut up," but it is much to be feared that the larger trinity of seeing straight, thinking clear, and acting square, is beyond their limited comprehension, and so, meanwhile, the innocent suffer for the guilty. It is the bounden duty of all respectable people,including "Jarvies" to check these practices by every means in their power. And it is practically incumbent on many owners to filter off much of this undesirable class by making a charge for admission.

lazy_hoor: (Default)
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Ace Merrill!


lazy_hoor: (Drunk Victorian Brummie)
VIRAGOS, and the WIFE-BEATING ACT.

A " shrewish-looking woman," and  "a strong good-tempered looking man" appeared at the Thames Police-court on Thursday, before Mr. Yardley, in a matter which proves, what we have long suspected, that the Act for punishing wife-beating is occasionally perverted, and made use of by viragos as a means for wreaking vengeance upon their husbands. The husbands who give their wives a sound thrashing are not invariably such brutes as are supposed; and sometimes they are more deserving of sympathy than the wife. A man may be provoked and aggravated by a worthless, drunken woman, to a pitch which leads him to inflict personal chastisement upon her, and then, she turns round upon him and invokes the penalties of the Act in the certainty that her mischievous and revengeful object will be gained by the man's committal to prison. Sho is then for a time her own mistress, converts the household furniture into gin, and while the husband is expiating his offence in gaol, she is leading uncontrolled a life of disgusting profligacy and dissipation.

In the case in question, the woman, after spitting in, her husband's face, struck him, and gave him a black eye, saying at the same time.-—"I'll make you hit me, and then I'll give you six months of it." The woman pointed to her own blackened eye, which she accused her husband of having produced, saying that " it was not the first by many." But fortunately he was enabled to refer to one of the officers of the court, who confirmed the statement that she had got it in fighting with another woman. But for this fortunate turn in the evidence, the man might have been punished instead of the woman. He said:—"I avoided striking her, Sir, as I knew what the consequences would be. I lead a dreadful life through the violence of her temper." No doubt of it; and if he had administered a little wholesome correction to the tigress, the public would probably have applauded the sentence which deprived him of his liberty for a few months, taking but little account of the provocation he had endured. Mr. Yardley, who, as a magistrate, is better able to appreciatethe hardships of such a case, said:—" This is one of the many instances which, I am sorry to say, are too numerous, in which women avail themselves of the provisions of the new law to irritate their husbands, by which the law is converted into a means of encouraging women in misbehaviour; and I wish there was some other enactment to counteract that tendency."

The woman was fined £5, and, in default of payment, was committed for two months. At the same time, the Act of last session seems scarcely to have abated the abomination of brutal acts of wife-beating; and there seems little hope of its having this effect, as the offence is usually committed in moments when the husband is excited by drink, and perfectly reckless of consequences. It may be that, when the sentence has expired, a different course is pursued, and the enforced forbearance may produce more domestic harmony. At all events, cases brought up for a repetition of the offence do not seem to occur. It would be interesting to learn the precise influence of the penal effects of the law.

-Editorial in The Era, June 11 1854
lazy_hoor: (bonnie & clyde)
Charles Mingus - legendary jazz musician, civil rights campaigner and  feline toilet-training expert.

"Don't bug the cat now"
lazy_hoor: (Drunk Victorian Brummie)
'I went into the outer counting-house to speak to Mr. Banks, and there I saw the prisoner standing with these two hunting-whips in his hands (produced, one had an iron hammer for the handle)—he held the cane-handled one towards me, and said, "Take that"
I said, "Why am I to take it?"
He said, "You take it"
I said, "I shall do nothing of the kind"

He walked out of the counting-house with the iron-handled whip in his hand, and walked a few yards from my gig which was standing at the door—I saw him wrap the thong round his hand, so as to make it quite tight—the lash was twisted round his hand—I waited some time by the door—I could hardly believe his assaulting me is my state of health, and I waited some minutes to give him time to reflect—I then proceeded towards my gig, and as I was about to step into it, I felt several blows on my back and shoulders from behind—I had nothing is my hand to defend myself with—after he had struck me several times, I turned round and put my hands up to my head—Mr. Banks came, caught him round his waist, pulled him away, and said, "Good God! Harvey are you mad"—the prisoner dashed Mr. Banks away, as if he had been a child—he seemed very much out of breath, and leaned against the front of the counting-house with the whip in his hand—I said, "You will have to account for this"
He said, "Yes, I know I shall have to pay for it, and I am d—d if I do not give it you; you accused me of stealing your pencil-case"'

(The witness, on attempting to leave the box, suddenly fell, and died on the floor of the Court almost immediately.)


Must have been a pretty snazzy pencil case.

Noooooooo!

Jun. 10th, 2011 02:22 pm
lazy_hoor: (Default)
 The question.

The answer.

I don't know who these people on beautifulpeople.com are, I can only guess they don't like freckles or ginger whiskers. Fools.
lazy_hoor: (Default)

Letter in Irish Times today:

Madam, – I recently discovered that it is against Dublin Bus regulations to sing on the bus. This seems authoritarian and petty. Buses are traditional venues for singing, and personally, I believe my morning commute would be enriched by hearing a fellow passenger lifting his or her voice to express the joys of life. Imagine how much social solidarity (in these difficult times) could be created by sing-alongs between strangers in transit.

Instead of forbidding singing on the bus, Dublin Bus should encourage it. It might also redirect its disapprobation towards the pot-smoking, ghetto-blaster-playing faction who often occupy the upstairs back seats on the 13 and 13A buses.

– Yours, etc,

MAOLSHEACHLANN O CEALLAIGH, Sillogue Gardens, Ballymun, Dublin 11.

lazy_hoor: (Down with this sort of thing)
If not ever.

Twitter cannot be allowed to operate outside the law


"Facebook and Twitter must be reeled in," froths Richard Hillgrove, business and political public relations consultant and safari hat fan. "Clearly, they are going to have to introduce a delay mechanism so that content can be checked before it goes up." 

I'd love to know how he thinks this might be implemented. Twitter has on average 3,440 tweets per second.  206,400 per minute. 1,238,4000 per hour.  Presumably someone has to check them all to make sure they're not breaking any super-injunction laws? 

I think this comment sums it up:

"Ah, I see the Guardian is up to it's old trick: get some random troll to write a completely outrageous and ill thought out piece of dickishness, and watch the site traffic go up as news of the dickishness spreads and many people feel compelled to comment.

Damn, I've fallen for it, haven't I?"
lazy_hoor: (Default)
"Goertz, attired in a Luftwaffe uniform, walked to Dublin and was not apprehended despite popping into a Garda barracks in Co Wicklow to ask for directions." 

Célestin Lainé, who tortured and murdered Resistance fighters, used to live in Rathgar, after being granted asylum by the Irish government.
lazy_hoor: (Default)
On Friday night one of my friends texted me: 'Watching the Late Late. How sad.' I replied 'I'm listening to Classic FM. We are middle-aged now'. We went to a hen party in Kilkenny the next day and although it was a lot of fun, we both expressed the sincere wish that it was the last one, for a while at least. Philip was at the stag in Mayo and spent Friday on the beach playing football. He's now finding movement quite difficult and his knees crackle when he stands up. And I have a limp. When did we suddenly become old? Ten years ago we had a disgracefully drunken weekend in Edinburgh and when we got back to Dublin we headed straight for the pub. Yesterday, after one late drunken night, I headed for the sofa with a nice cup of tea.
lazy_hoor: (Default)
On Friday night one of my friends texted me: 'Watching the Late Late. How sad.' I replied 'I'm listening to Classic FM. We are middle-aged now'. We went to a hen party in Kilkenny the next day and although it was a lot of fun, we both expressed the sincere wish that it was the last one, for a while at least. Philip was at the stag in Mayo and spent Friday on the beach playing football. He's now finding movement quite difficult and his knees crackle when he stands up. And I have a limp. When did we suddenly become old? Ten years ago we had a disgracefully drunken weekend in Edinburgh and when we got back to Dublin we headed straight for the pub. Yesterday, after one late drunken night, I headed for the sofa with a nice cup of tea.
lazy_hoor: (lollerskates)
Recipe in The Guardian today - "I bought most of the ingredients at Lidl, but you'd never know."
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